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youdumbbastard

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Oct. 16th, 2010 | 01:04 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

I'm going to shut this community down some time in the next week. Failed idea.

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youdumbbastard

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Mar. 10th, 2010 | 04:49 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

One of my favorite snacks of all time is boiled peanuts. There is a lot of mystery surrounding them, I think, but it is really quite simple. Everybody has their own recipe, more or less, and mine tends to be simple. I'll usually cook up a half pound at a time since I don't like a lot of them left over. It's a two-part operation.

First, you wash raw peanuts under hot water, what I do is fill up a big pot with water, swish them around, and then pour out the water several times just to get any dirt or funk that may be stuck to them. Then, pour in about a quarter cup of salt (kosher salt, avoid the iodized stuff), pour in enough water to cover them up with a little to spare, and put it on the stove to boil. Drop a plate down on the peanuts to hold them underwater and, as soon as it gets up to a good boil, turn the heat off and put a lid on it. Let it sit overnight, 8-10 hours.

The next morning, pour the water off, then rinse them again in several changes of water before topping them up once again, with a half cup of salt this time. Keep them on a low simmer with the lid on and every couple hours, as the water boils off, pour in boiling water to replenish. If the peanuts are fresh, it could only take as little as 4 hours; most of the time, however, it's more like 6-8, even 10. You know they're ready when they're soft and salty, like cooked beans. In fact, this is the story I've heard about the origin of boiled peanuts--since they grow in pods like beans, the early white settlers of the Americas thought that they should be cooked like beans, even though that's not what the native people of the region did with them. Oh well!

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youdumbbastard

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Mar. 9th, 2010 | 12:26 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

I've been seeking out low-lactose or lactose-free foods that I can serve to Cherie. Of course this led back to something that I enjoyed when I was little (never straight), which was buttermilk. You can find some old people who like to put salt and pepper in it and just drink it, or you can make a lassi out of it by adding just enough sugar to cover up the sourness and a pinch of salt, but the way we'd always use is was buttermilk pancakes and waffles.

Man do I love waffles. Typically, I enjoy recipes with even fractions, especially if they're 1:1:1:1 sort of deals, so setting out to make buttermilk waffles this was my motivation. Therefore:

1 cup buttermilk
1 scant cup flour (probably closer to 7/8, but I can just a 1 cup scoop and just not fill it all the way)
1 egg
1/2 tsp baking soda and 1/2 tsp baking powder (makes 1 tsp, haha)
1 small dash vanilla (ok this is pushing it on the "1" thing, but think a scant 1/8 tsp)
1/4 tsp salt (ok, no "1" here, but if you are a weirdo that uses a salt cellar you could argue it's "1" large pinch)
2+ Tbsp light oil (the + is to let the oil spill over the sides a little bit when you're measuring, a little extra on each)

That's it! If you have a well-seasoned (or non-stick, shudder) waffle iron, the oil ensures that it will not stick to the plates and be nice and fluffy. There is no trace of sourness whatsoever (of course it helps that I pour about a cup and a half of maple syrup on each waffle). Of course, what I do is to add the flour, then the salt, then the baking soda and powder to a sifter and sift it through to mix them all, but you can just as easily put them all in a bowl and whisk it heartily. A lot of recipes want you to whisk together the wet ingredients separately but I have a horror at having too many messy bowls at the end of anything so i just crack the egg into the middle of the flour, break the yolk by stabbing it with the whisk, dropping a bit of vanilla onto that, then pouring in the buttermilk while whisking the egg around to incorporate them together and after a sort while add in the oil too. Works just fine. On my waffle iron an overflowering 1/3 cup is just right for a waffle, and 1/2 cup is far too much.

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youdumbbastard

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Feb. 4th, 2010 | 12:24 am
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

Read more...Collapse )

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youdumbbastard

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Jan. 8th, 2010 | 02:51 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

I forgot about posting this until just now, as I just added some to my coffee.

Citrus Peel in Heavy SyrupCollapse )

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youdumbbastard

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Dec. 30th, 2009 | 09:45 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

One of my enduring loves is chowder. Chowder of all kinds. My favorite I think will always be New England clam chowder, but cod chowder is a goddamn close second. After Cherie earlier went COD CHOWDER at me as I walked in the bedroom, I knew what I must do.

Chowder Tiger, Hidden CodCollapse )

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youdumbbastard

Crockpot Gumbo

Dec. 29th, 2009 | 10:45 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

We just acquired a crockpot in excellent shape from a charity shop and over the past couple weeks we've both been thinking of things to do with it. Making French Onion Soup was a resounding success; I'll probably post the recipe when I finalize it. Another thing I immediately wanted to do was to make gumbo, since it's a slow-cooking recipe as it is. I'm a big fan of "file gumbo" over "okra gumbo" if only because good file is more easily available than good okra. The problem with file gumbo is that it's usually more of the game-meat persuasion where the okra is more of the seafood persuasion. But I don't think those boundaries are hard and fast, and especially using "gamey" seafood like crawdads and oysters helps a lot. I didn't have any oysters but I'll probably have some next time on this, but here you go.

Crockpot Seafood GumboCollapse )

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youdumbbastard

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Oct. 9th, 2009 | 09:33 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

For a while now I've been on a sort of light Indian kick, specifically with Daal. I don't generally like buying Daal at restaurants for some reason, so I like to make it at home, with different kinds of daal. One of my favorites is toor daal, which is also known as "pigeon pea," but it has really terrible GI effects. Not GI like those brave young men who are protecting our freedom as AMERICANS, but GI as in gastrointestinal. It apparently has undigestible sugars that your body has to become acclimated to before you get used to it, and it really is a tasty bean, but my god, the pain and the smell is enough to "contraindicate" using this bean. Unless you've got like, a TON of beano. A more pleasant alternative with a lighter flavor is the moong daal.

my daal recipeCollapse )

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youdumbbastard

Butterbeer

Aug. 30th, 2009 | 10:57 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

This is my recipe for butterbeer. If you don't like it, you can go to hell.

1 can (12 oz) cream soda
2-4 oz butterscotch schnapps (I think hiram walker tastes marginally better than dekuyper)

turn the oven on to "warm" or "150," whatever your lowest setting is, and put the can inside. Leave the oven door open a crack, and keep checking it. After about 20 minutes or so, it should have warmed up to slightly higher than body temperature. Keep checking it, I'm serious. Pour the schnapps into a TALL glass, like a zombie glass if you have one, and then tilt the glass and pour the soda slowly down the side. Using a long spoon, SLOWLY stir the soda, lifting the bowl up to incorporate the heavier schnapps into the lighter soda, but if you stir too aggressively, the warm soda will explode over the top of the glass and soak your kitchen. I'd say that probably 2-3 oz is good, but if you like a little bit more sweetness to it, do all 4. Experiment, see what you like. Also, I've found that cheap-shit store brand cream soda tastes a lot better with the schnapps than fancy expensive stuff, since it's less sweet and a little blander. Using IBC or upper end brands tends to end up being a little TOO sweet. You can pour in a couple ounces of ginger ale if it's still too sweet, but don't overdo it on that because it'll change the flavor.

OH, and if you, for whatever reason, cannot or will not consume alcohol, you can get butterscotch syrup for coffee and pour in about an ounce of that for the same effect. Although it won't get house elves drunk. But you can always still push them down the stairs and slam their heads in the door for the same effect.

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youdumbbastard

zucchini

Aug. 13th, 2009 | 08:10 pm
posted by: hyperform in youdumbbastard

zucchini zucchiniCollapse )

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